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Disaster Strikes


Part 1-Beneath the Surface: Gulf Seafood's Fight for Survival. One year after the explosion that caused the devastating oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, this WebTV video series asks the basic question: Is the seafood safe?

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What Now?


The spill had a devastating effect on Louisiana’s oyster crop, destroying about half of the state’s oyster beds. Ironically, it wasn’t the oil that killed the oysters. In the vast majority of cases, it was fresh water from the Mississippi River, poured into the coastal estuaries to keep the oil from reaching shore, that killed millions of oysters. To survive, oysters require a delicate balance of salt water and fresh water. The fresh water brought in to keep the oil from reaching the coast disrupted that fragile balance. The change in the water’s salinity destroyed thousands of oyster beds.

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Let's Eat


In this part of the Beneath the Surface series, we discover what the chefs in New Orleans are doing to move past the disaster and keep serving the best seafood they can. Much of the series focuses on the plight of the Gulf oyster, among the most versatile delicacies of Gulf seafood. Oysters can be eaten on the half shell, raw, smoked, boiled, baked, fried, roasted, stewed, canned, pickled, steamed, broiled or used in a variety of drinks. They are widely reputed to be an aphrodisiac. And they are one of the species most impacted by the Gulf oil spill.

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The Future of Seafood


Some say it will take years for the oyster beds to recover. But, as you’ll see in this documentary, the people of New Orleans have been knocked down before, and they always get back up. There can be no doubt they will again.